QU CULTURE & ARTS CHAPTER IN QU ALUMNI ASSOCIATION ORGANIZES CULTURAL WEBINAR ENTITLED – SLANG DIALECTS AND THEIR ELOQUENT ROOTS

Culture

Culture & Arts Chapter in Qatar University (QU) Alumni Association has organized cultural webinar entitled: (Slang dialects and their eloquent roots), presented by Dr. Muhammad Khaled Al-Rhawi, Assistant Professor of Arabic Language at College of Arts and Sciences.

 

The webinar aimed to address the differentiation between formal and informal terms used, clarifying the eloquent roots of dialect in general. The webinar shed light on Qatari dialect in particular at all levels; such as structure, sounds and the most important phenomena related to them, while presenting Arabic evidence dating back to the era of linguistic protest against them, as well as an indication of the levels of linguistic use in the past.

 

The goal of the webinar was to restore confidence in what we say rather than be worried about it. As it is a rich container for linguistic phenomena that have possessed the elements of strength and immortality that have allowed them to continue and live on people’s tongues from ancient times to the present day, and to answer questions like: Does what we speak in our daily vernacular have authentic Arabic roots? Are there any differences in usage now compared to the era of eloquence?

 

Commenting on the webinar, Amna Abdulkarim, Vice President of Culture & Arts Chapter- QU Alumni Association said, “At Culture & Arts Chapter in Qatar University (QU) Alumni Association we raise subjects such as; “Slang Dialects and their Eloquent Roots” since it is so important in our daily lives, in terms of communication and expressing our feelings. In addition to the fact that dialects are almost like special identities for Arab societies, for every society has its own identity and dialect, which are undeniably part of the Arab identity and the great Arab community. The need to know where and what we speak is located on the maps of the Arabic language, to truly know whether it is an authentic Arabic language or not. As for every society has its own identity and its own dialect, which are undoubtedly, part of the Arab identity and the great Arab community.”

 

For his part, Dr. Muhammad Khaled Al-Rhawi, Assistant Professor of Arabic Language at College of Arts and Sciences, said: “The local Arabic dialects of today, particularly in the Arabian Peninsula, were not invented by people of this generation, but are very old. Date back to before Islam; it was passed down from generation to generation until it reached us and it possessed elements of strength and characteristics that allowed it to remain alive and circulating on our tongues”. “Linguists and dictionaries did not record it because some phenomena do not have letters in Arabic written by them, and writing cannot fully represent the pronunciation referring to some of the changes in dialects caused by time and the civilized communication brought about by modern means of communication”.

 

Dr. Al-Rhawi added, “The classical Arabic language was and still is the language of literature and official discourse, and dialects were and still are the language of the daily vernacular to manage daily matters, except if it is intended to promote the classical.”

 

Source: QATAR UNIVERSITY