Five adapted plays vie for best production at Turkey’s Afife awards

Five Turkish adaptations of foreign plays by Istanbul-based theater companies emerged as leading contenders for this year’s Afife Theater Awards, whose nominees were announced in a Monday evening news conference in Istanbul.

Sponsored by YapI Kredi Bank and named after Turkey’s first stage actress, Afife Jale, the awards recognize achievements by Turkish theater companies in 11 categories such as best production, best directing and best music of the year, as well as leading and supporting acting categories.

Hayvan CcediliftliIi, an adaptation of George Orwell’s well-known dystopian novella Animal Farm by the BakIrkoumly Municipal Theater, and two plays by the Istanbul Municipal Theater — Bir Yaz Gecesi RuumlyasI, a Turkish rendition of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and SIrccedila Hayvan Koleksiyonu, a Turkish production of Tennessee Williams’ 1944 play The Glass Menagerie, which marked Williams’ breakthrough as a leading playwright — are vying for the best production of the year award.

The private theater Dot is also in the running with Iki KiIilik Yaz, its adaptation of the musical play Midsummer, written by David Greig and Gordon McIntyre and another private company, Oyun Atoumllyesi, rounds out the best production of the year nominees with Dolu DuumlIuumln BoI KonuI, a Turkish production of the award-winning play Kvetch by Steven Berkoff.

Directors Alexandar Popovski of Bir Yaz Gecesi RuumlyasI, Muharrem Oumlzcan of Dolu DuumlIuumln BoI KonuI and YIldIrIm Fikret UraI of SIrccedila Hayvan Koleksiyonu were among the five nominees for the best director of the year award.

TuIrul Tuumllek and Gizem Erdem, who share the leading roles in Iki KiIilik Yaz, are up for best actor and best actress, respectively. Fatih Al and Hasibe Eren are also nominated for best actor and actress for their parts in Dolu DuumlIuumln BoI KonuI.

The winners of the 19th YapI Kredi Afife Theater Awards will be announced on April 27 at a ceremony in Istanbul.

SOURCE: TODAY’S ZAMAN