Who will benefit from disagreement?

During the military operation to evacuate Suleyman Iah’s tomb in Syria, there was no tension whatsoever between the Turkish Armed Forces (TSK) and the Syrian Kurds’ Democratic Union Party (PYD). That was good sign for the future of the settlement process.

We can’t know that for sure, but it is highly probable that before the operation, Turkish authorities — especially civilian ones — contacted the PYD and persuaded them that the Turkish soldiers would not harm Syria

During the military operation to evacuate Suumlleyman Iah’s tomb in Syria, there was no tension whatsoever between the Turkish Armed Forces (TSK) and the Syrian Kurds’ Democratic Union Party (PYD). That was good sign for the future of the settlement process.

We can’t know that for sure, but it is highly probable that before the operation, Turkish authorities — especially civilian ones — contacted the PYD and persuaded them that the Turkish soldiers would not harm Syrian Kurds while in Syrian territory.

This doesn’t mean that the Turkish army cooperated with Syria’s Kurdish groups, but at least they didn’t shoot at each other, and some kind of contact was established between them Those who prefer antagonism were, of course, extremely disturbed by this entente.

In his letter read out during the Nevruz celebrations, Abdullah Oumlcalan — the jailed leader of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) — emphasized that Turkish-Kurdish cooperation was very fruitful in Syria Suddenly, the PKK’s acting leader in northern Iraq, Murat KarayIlan, made a very harsh statement against Turkish President Recep Tayyip ErdoIan and the latter responded with equally severe words. Moreover, a crisis erupted between the president and the government and the press begun questioning the settlement process.

It was interesting that the TSK immediately felt the need to publish a statement about the Kurdish issue. They announced that the Turkish army has never cooperated with the PYD — which they consider a terrorist organization and therefore nothing but an enemy.

The army simultaneously launched operations against PKK positions in the country. These operations were very local and small-scale, but they were enough to raise questions about the future of the peace negotiations.

If we start hearing reports about skirmishes between the army and the PKK on a daily basis, public opinion will believe that these negotiations are in vain and that the PKK cannot be an interlocutor The Kurdish political movement will once again be accused of supporting terrorism and all this will put the government in a very delicate position just before the elections. Some commentators believe the disagreement between the president and the government is the result of a major internal division within the governing Justice and Development Party (AK Party).

Some have even asked if the latter will be able to form a single-party government in the wake of the elections.

The timing of the army’s statement was very well chosen.

For those who have basic information about Turkey’s political history, it is obvious that this was no coincidence. Some may claim that the army has lost its political clout, but this is not entirely true.

In fact, it may still be eager to fill any power vacuum If the governing party is indeed in turmoil, that means one of the negotiating sides in the Kurdish issue is in difficulty. That could make the other negotiating side feel more powerful, so they may start asking for more and more during the negotiations.

If the Turkish public gets the impression that the Kurdish side keeps asking for more, and that they may even ask for autonomy — or even secession in the end — it will react strongly. Anyway, if the Kurdish movement adopts a maximalist attitude, the government may find it hard to continue negotiating, the entire process may collapse and the PKK may resume the armed campaign.

According to this scenario, those who have supported the settlement process until now, especially the AK Party and the Kurdish political movement, will lose. But who will win? The Nationalist Movement Party (MHP), to some extent.

But more than that, nationalist feeling will grow stronger, exactly like the institution which claims to represent quotnational valuesquot more than any other institution in the country: the army.

SOURCE: TODAY’S ZAMAN