Turkish parties exploring coalition options following historic election

Following Sundayand’s general election in which no single party obtained the absolute majority required to form a government, Turkish politics will seek a way out in the form of a fragile coalition government, with snap elections on the horizon.
The ruling Justice and Development Party (AK Party) emerged as the leading party in the June 7 election, obtaining almost 41 percent of the vote, but has lost its majority in Parliament for the first time since coming to power.
Deputy Prime Minister Numan Kurtulmui said on Monday that forming a coalition government is the partyand’s first option, but conceded that an early election could be on the cards should it fail to do so. However, it appears that it will be a difficult task for the ruling party to find a coalition partner, with all opposition parties having spoken out against a coalition with the AK Party on the night of the election.
The reason for this is simple: An agreement to work with the AK Party could cause them lose support because it is identified by sympathizers of opposition parties with corruption, authoritarian rule and discourse bordering on hate speech towards the opposition.
The support of at least 276 deputies, which represents an outright majority in the 550-seat Parliament, is needed for a government to be formed. To discuss possible coalition scenarios and snap elections, Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoilu met with Cabinet ministers and members of the AK Partyand’s Central Executive Board (MYK) on Monday. The prime minister was expected to meet with President Recep Tayyip Erdogan following the meeting, but rumor has it that the meeting has been postponed until Tuesday.
According to unofficial figures, with almost 97 percent of the vote counted, the ruling party has obtained 257 deputies, with 40.64 percent of the vote. The main opposition Republican Peopleand’s Party (CHP) got 131 deputies with 25.32 percent of the vote and the Nationalist Movement Party (MHP) 82 deputies with 16.55 percent, while the pro-Kurdish Peoplesand’ Democratic Party (HDP) won 81 deputies with 12.89 percent of the vote.
MHP leader Devlet Bahandceli, usually seen as the AK Partyand’s most probable partner, almost ruled out any possibility of cooperation with the AK Party, saying the country should hold snap elections if the ruling party is unable to form a coalition government with other opposition parties. and”The first possibility … should be between the AKP [another name for the AK Party] and the HDP. The second model could consist of the AKP, the CHP and the HDP,andquot he said in a press meeting at the MHPand’s party headquarters after midnight on Monday. andquotShould all these scenarios fail, then early elections must be held,andquot he added.
CHP Chairman Haluk Koandc and HDP Co-chair Selahattin Demirtai also ruled out a coalition with the ruling party in press meetings on Monday night. and”We promised our supporters that we would not form an internal or external coalition with the AKP. We are clear on that,and” Demirtai said.
By and”internal,and” the HDP co-chair was referring to the possibility of entering a formal coalition with the AK Party, while and”externaland” signifies support given to an AK Party minority government in Parliament without officially being part of the government.
Koandc suggested that the election results offer the CHP the chance to be the central party in a coalition. The remark was based on the fact that all three opposition parties have declared that they will not form a coalition with the AK Party.
Even if the AK Party succeeds in striking a deal with an opposition party, it is expected to last only until snap elections, which could be held in autumn of this year. It may be for this reason that on Monday a leading AK Party figure challenged opposition parties to form a coalition government among themselves, without the AK Partyand’s involvement. and”If there is going to be a coalition, the CHP, the MHP and the HDP should try to form it. Let them try this first, and AK Party is ready to do its part if they fail to do so,andquot Deputy Prime Minister Bandulent Arinandc told reporters in Ankara.
As previously suggested by Binali Yildirim, an AK Party deputy who is a top aiser to President Erdogan, the AK Party may decide to form a minority government. A minority government could also be formed through a coalition by the CHP and the MHP, which could also be supported externally by the HDP. It is thought that the right-wing MHP would not agree to be part of a formal coalition with the HDP because it has accused the pro-Kurdish party of seeking to dismember the country by demanding autonomy for the predominantly Kurdish Southeast.
In his first comments on the election results, President Erdogan said in a statement that that no party has a mandate to form a government alone and that he hopes all parties will assess the outcome in a and”healthy and realistic manner.and”
h2Procedure to be followed for new governmenth2 The Supreme Election Board (YSK) is expected to announce the official results of the general election in 10 days and an oath-taking ceremony is expected to be held on either June 22 or 23, with the attendance of the deputies of the 25th Parliament.
As the oldest deputy, CHP deputy Deniz Baykal will assume a temporary role as the speaker of Parliament until the new speaker is elected by deputies within five days after the official announcement of the result.
On June 24, Erdogan is expected to task a member of the AK Party — most probably Prime Minister Davutoilu, as per customary practice — with forming a government. The AK Party would have to find a coalition partner within 45 days of such a move.
If the AK Party fails to form a government, two options are on the table for Erdogan. Either he will assign the duty of forming the government to the CHP, because it is the second-largest party in the new Parliament, or he will decide to hold a snap election after consulting with Parliamentand’s speaker.
In that case, an interim government would be formed by a prime minister assigned by the president within five days of the decision to call for a new election. This interim government would not be required to obtain a vote of confidence and can govern the country until new elections are held.
hr h2Procedure to be followed for formation of new governmenth2
The Supreme Election Board (YSK) is expected to announce the official results of the June 7 election in 10 days, and an oath-taking ceremony will be held on either June 22 or 23 with the attendance of the deputies of the 25th Parliament.
Main opposition Republican Peopleand’s Party (CHP) deputy Deniz Baykal will assume his temporary role as speaker of parliament as the oldest deputy in the legislature until the new parliament speaker is elected by the deputies over the next five days.
President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is expected to assign the Justice and Development Party (AK Party) the task of forming a government on June 24. In the following 45 days, the AK Party has to find a coalition partner as required by the Constitution.
If the AK Party fails to form a government, two options are on the table for Erdogan.
Either he will assign the CHP the duty of forming a government, as is the customary practice, or he will decide to hold of a snap election after consulting with the parliament speaker.
An interim government will be formed by a prime minister assigned by the president, within five days of the decision to call for a new election.
The interim government is not required to get a vote of confidence and can govern the country until the new elections are held.

SOURCE: Today’s Zaman