Settlement process in real crisis: Who’s responsible?

The settlement process launched to resolve Turkey’s long-standing Kurdish issue and terrorism problem has been on our radar for more than two years now, but for the first time ever, it’s facing a serious crisis. Of course, there had been talk in the past of various threats to the process, but this time around, the situation is more critical.

And at the heart of it all lies President Recep Tayyip ErdoIan himself. One of the smaller past crises faced by the pr

The settlement process launched to resolve Turkey’s long-standing Kurdish issue and terrorism problem has been on our radar for more than two years now, but for the first time ever, it’s facing a serious crisis.

Of course, there had been talk in the past of various threats to the process, but this time around, the situation is more critical. And at the heart of it all lies President Recep Tayyip ErdoIan himself.

One of the smaller past crises faced by the process was the secretariat crisis, which came about when it was said that imprisoned Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) leader Abdullah Oumlcalan needed a secretariat in order to help him carry out his business. Of course, this was definitely a fake crisis all it really meant was that some of the prisoners kept in the same prison with Oumlcalan were to be switched with others.

Which is what happened, and the crisis was solved. Then there was the Kobani crisis, which was more of a real crisis.

The Kurds of Turkey were up in arms over the invasion of the border town Kobani by Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) forces there was a push to get Turkey to allow international assistance to make its way to Kobani via Turkish land. For example, the peshmerga forces of the Iraqi regional Kurdish leadership being able to reach Kobani with their weapons was only going to be possible if they traveled through Turkey.

But the Justice and Development Party (AKP) government was not listening to these demands. The pro-Kurdish Peoples’ Democratic Party (HDP) called on people to take to the streets in protest over the situation on Oct.

6, 2014. And the next day, during a speech in Antep, President ErdoIan referred to Kobani as being on the verge of falling.

What really wound up triggering the flood of protestors onto the streets had actually been the president’s words. As a result of the three days of protests in the Turkish Southeast, more than 50 people lost their lives.

Many homes and workplaces were damaged. Lots of people were arrested.

Calming the situation down was only possible when the National Intelligence Organization (MIT) received a message from Oumlcalan aimed at stopping the events that were unfolding. There were some important lessons to be learned from the Kobani events.

Why did the Kurds seem so angry during the settlement process? Finding the answer to this question, and thus calculating the real meaning of these events, is still important. Throughout the process, we’ve witnessed a panoply of mini-crises often shaped around questions like Why did the HDP delegation not go more often to Imrali? or Why did the delegation go late? Of course, these crises were always presented to the public as having been major crises, with later news proclaiming, The crisis has been resolved

SOURCE: TODAY’S ZAMAN