Opposition suggests referendum on nuclear power plant

The opposition Republican People’s Party (CHP) has suggested a referendum on a Turkey-Japan-France nuclear power plant deal and its relevant legal framework. CHP deputy Engin Altay, a representative from Sinop — the northern province where the nuclear plant is to be built — called for the referendum in a recent statement.

“The reactor that is planned to be built in Sinop has no accreditation and has not been well tested. It has been installed o

The opposition Republican People’s Party (CHP) has suggested a referendum on a Turkey-Japan-France nuclear power plant deal and its relevant legal framework.

CHP deputy Engin Altay, a representative from Sinop — the northern province where the nuclear plant is to be built — called for the referendum in a recent statement.

The reactor that is planned to be built in Sinop has no accreditation and has not been well tested.

It has been installed once elsewhere and is not working. They are taking a big risk.

If [Energy Minister] Taner YIldIz is so interested, he can go and build one in Kayseri, said Altay, referring to YIldIz’s home province.

According to Altay, successfully solving the epidemic of stolen electricity that plagues the southeastern regions of the country should come before construction of a power plant, as increases in energy demand have been vastly outpaced by increases in energy imports.

He said that while energy demand increased 129 percent between 1990 and 2012, imports increased by 220 percent between 2002 and 2012.

Turkey does not currently have any nuclear power plants, but has plans for three, including a controversial facility in Mersin on the Mediterranean coast of southern Turkey.

The other two plants are planned for the Black Sea province of Sinop and the northwestern province of KIrklareli. Several protests have been staged in opposition to the plans.

Construction on the Akkuyu nuclear power plant in Mersin was to begin in April or May of this year — as soon as Russian state-run nuclear company Rosatom received an environmental impact report from the Turkish government. But the report has yet to be provided.

The second Turkish nuclear plant, to be built by a Japanese-French consortium, will be ready come 2023, the year of the 100th anniversary of the Turkish Republic.

On May 2013, Japan’s Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI), Itochu Corp.

and France’s GDF Suez agreed to build Turkey’s second nuclear power plant at an estimated cost of $22 billion. The 4,800 megawatt plant in the Black Sea town of Sinop will use Atmea1 reactors developed by MHE and French Areva

SOURCE: TODAY’S ZAMAN