Haitian government assumes very strong leadership in fight against Cholera

The UN’s top humanitarian official in Haiti says the government there has assumed “very strong leadership” in the fight against Cholera.

Peter De Clercq, the Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General, Humanitarian Coordinator and Resident Representative in Haiti said in a departure interview after two years in the country, “We’ve seen very strong leadership of the government, particularly of the Haitian Ministry of Health to take on this problematic, both in terms of the short-term combat of the disease – the rapid intervention of it happens – as well as for the longer-term measures that are required to build an environment where cholera and other waterborne diseases will not be able to claim the victims that they have. So that I’ve seen progress on.”

He said the government’s work on the social sector leaves the country better prepared for natural disasters which he said are a “certainty” in the next few years.

“He said, I’ve seen an increased interest in the government to not only look at investment, but to look also more and more at the social sector, so that we don’t leave behind large parts of the population. But anyway a good basis for economic investment in this country is a number of basic facilities, particularly a healthy population, and a population that is resilient to some of the challenges that are there – this year this country is going to be hit by natural disasters –that is a certainty over the next few years. And the more we can prepare it, the less impact there will be for this natural disasters, and the more of a safe climate we will have for this country.”

SHOTLIST

1 JUNE 2015, ARCHIVES, PORT-AU-PRINCE, VARIOUS, HAITI

Cuban Doctor Cholera Treatment Centre

Internal Displaced Person’s camp in Port-au-PrInce

24 JANUARY 2015, PORT-AU-PRINCE

Peter de Clercq greeting United Nations Security Council representatives arriving to a joint UN-government rehabilitated neighbourhood for ex-Internal Displaced Persons, called 16/6 project

Staff of 16/6 project waiting

UN Security Council delegation walking through 16/6 neighbourhood

Various, Vulnerable people living with handicap being evacuated before hurricane alert

Various, fishermen and fish saleswoman in vulnerable area of Port-au-PrInce

SOUNDBITE (English) – Peter De Clercq, outgoing Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General, Humanitarian Coordinator and Resident Representative in Haiti: “We’ve seen very strong leadership of the government, particularly of the Haitian Ministry of Health to take on this problematic, both in terms of the short-term combat of the disease – the rapid intervention of it happens – as well as for the longer-term measures that are required to build an environment where cholera and other waterborne diseases will not be able to claim the victims that they have. So that I’ve seen progress on.”

SOUNDBITE (English) – – Peter De Clercq, outgoing Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General, Humanitarian Coordinator and Resident Representative in Haiti: “More cases of cholera have appeared, which is as a result of, in particular, criminal gangs in some of the slum areas and some of the densely populated areas, where they open op the drinking water pipelines to sell the water from there to neighbourhood where there is no drinking water is available. And by doing that they are actually polluting the water sources and people are drinking from the tap polluted water. So this is a very big challenge. The government is aware of that and they are trying to address it.”

SOUNDBITE (English) – – Peter De Clercq, outgoing Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General, Humanitarian Coordinator and Resident Representative in Haiti: “Less and less we see the dependence on the International agencies- the NGOs, the UN, and we see more and more the government taking the lead on some of the most important strategic questions.”

SOUNDBITE (English) – – Peter De Clercq, outgoing Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General, Humanitarian Coordinator and Resident Representative in Haiti: “I’ve seen an increased interest in the government to not only look at investment, but to look also more and more at the social sector, so that we don’t leave behind large parts of the population. But anyway a good basis for economic investment in this country is a number of basic facilities, particularly a healthy population, and a population that is resilient to some of the challenges that are there – this year this country is going to be hit by natural disasters –that is a certainty over the next few years. And the more we can prepare it, the less impact there will be for this natural disasters, and the more of a safe climate we will have for this country.”

SOURCE: CIHAN