Endless scenarios unfold in Ankara

In a speech made recently before members of the military academy, President Recep Tayyip ErdoIan avowed: “We were all tricked and mislead, myself included, by those operations. A structure that took root in our state, with powerful media support, tried to carry out a plot aimed at taking over Turkey.

And now, in all sincerity, I can say that I was never truly willing to see those former commanders of the military — so many of whom I knew well from working closely with them — a

In a speech made recently before members of the military academy, President Recep Tayyip ErdoIan avowed: andldquoWe were all tricked and mislead, myself included, by those operations. A structure that took root in our state, with powerful media support, tried to carry out a plot aimed at taking over Turkey.

And now, in all sincerity, I can say that I was never truly willing to see those former commanders of the military — so many of whom I knew well from working closely with them — arrested.andrdquo

What drove ErdoIan to make this speech? Some desire to become closer to the Turkish Armed Forces (TSK) by painting the picture of a domestic enemy? We can never know what ErdoIan is really thinking.

But everyone knows that in Ankara, political cards are shuffled through the night and then redistributed in the morning. In the Turkish capital, political as well as civilian and military bureaucracy take information that comes in from Istanbuland#39s business world, its media, its foreign diplomats and even its housewives, distilling it and then proffering it up later in restaurants, patisseries and hotel lobbies.

In Turkey, the story that drives the politics is dreamed up in Istanbul and then put into action in Ankara

Letand#39s turn to questions now. Is there talk of a coup in Ankara? When the military began its coup preparations, was there talk of a coup akin to the May 27 [1960] bottom-to-top coup being about to happen? In Ankara, foreign diplomats donand#39t talk about possible coups.

Topics not discussed by foreign diplomats are generally not even remotely possible. But doesnand#39t gossip usually focus on things that are distinctly possible? Are we talking about coup prep that was spread out over a few years? Capitals are never lacking in political gossip.

Whether or not there really was any talk of a coup, is it not interesting that the military has begun to be thought of as an alternative after so many years? Could all the coup chat be a reflection of the desires of the secular factions that hate ErdoIan? Could it be that secular Turks — whose dreams were never realized with either the Gezi protests or the potentially game-changing December 2013 corruption allegations — are finally once again investing hope in the Turkish military? Or could this all be a rumor being circulated by a Justice and Development Party (AKP) anxious to turn coup attempts into votes for itself?

In Turkey, a military coup would not happen just to make secular Turks happy. Instead, it would happen in order to harmonize Turkey with the foreign policies as well as the political and economic interests of the West.

So why would a coup be thought about now? Could it be to resettle Turkey onto the right tracks, towards the West, once again? Could a few months of Salafi-style terror, unleashed on big-city streets in Turkey, be used as a reason to bring about a coup in the style of Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi? In Turkey, there are always assertions that coups take place for the sake of democracy. But of course, coups always wind up harming Turkish democracy.

For this reason, if any coup were to actually take place in this New Cold War era, it would only cause damage to Turkish democracy.

SOURCE: Today’s Zaman