Republicans fear losing all with Trump

By Samie Al-Dulaimi WASHINGTON, May 7 (KUNA) — A party leader in Donald Trump is looking less and less appealing for Republicans who fear they might lose much more than just the presidency of the United States.
The reputation of the party and its fundamental core principles, in a nation built on diversity, and a majority in the two houses of Congress are in danger of slipping away.
Texas Senator Ted Cruz and Ohio Governor John Kasich had both stuck around despite the huge margin of delegates separating them from the frontrunner in hope they would be able to stop Trump from securing 1,237 delegates needed to reach nomination for the Oval Office.
Their attempts failed miserably and they dropped out as Trump racked up seven back-to-back primaries, most recently Indiana, and became the presumptive party nominee with 1,068 delegates ahead of a likely face-off with Democrat Hillary Clinton.
The celebrity businessman has angered many in the country with his impulse-driven and audacious campaign remarks on Mexicans, Muslims and women, and major Republican party figures are starting to voice their disapproval as the internal divide grows wider.
“If you listen to or watch Hispanic media in the state and in the country, you will see that it is all anti-Trump,” said fellow Republican John McCain, who lost his own presidential race to current President Barack Obama back in 2008.
“The Hispanic community is roused and angry in a way that I’ve never seen in 30 years,” the Arizona Senator had told reporters, as he fears that “with over 30 percent of the vote being Hispanic vote, (there is) no doubt that this may be the race of my life.” Maine Senator Susan Collins believes that “Donald Trump has the opportunity to unite the party, but if he’s going to build that wall (with Mexico) that he keeps talking about, he’s going to have mend a lot of fences.
“He’s going to have to stop with gratuitous personal insults,” added the Republican in an interview with NBC news.
Senator Jeff Flake, another Republican, said that a “ban on Muslims – a religious test for people entering the country? I cannot see support for a Republican nominee who would do that. He may well back away. I certainly hope he does.” US House or Representatives Speaker Paul Ryan, himself, came out to distance himself from the presidential hopeful, by saying that he was “just not ready” to endorse Trump.
“We hope that our nominee aspires to be Lincoln and Reaganesque,” he said in reference to former Republican presidents Abraham Lincoln and Ronald Reagan.
“I think conservatives want to know – does he share our values and our principles?,” he told US media. Republicans are looking for someone who “appeals to a vast majority of Americans.” His remarks had followed statements made by the spokesmen of both George H. W. Bush and George W. Bush, which said that the ex-Republican presidents would not be endorsing Trump or attending the party convention in July.
For the Democratic party, President Obama himself warned that “this is not entertainment, this is not a reality show. This is a contest for the presidency of the United States.” He told a roomful of reporters in the White House that every candidate should be subject to “exacting standards and genuine scrutiny” as a president’s foreign policy “could threaten war or has the potential of upending our critical relationships with other countries.” In conclusion, analysts have gone as far as suggesting that Republicans are hoping that their Democratic rival Hillary Clinton beats Trump to become US president.
“For some Republicans, the prospect of a President Clinton is more palatable than a President Trump – not because they like Clinton but because they could fight her on familiar terrain, rather than watching an unpredictable Trump use the power of the White House to remake the GOP (Republican Party),” said the Washington Post. (end) sd.mt

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